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Itaipu cumulative output could power the entire Earth for 37 days
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02/01/2015

Itaipu Binational reaches the end of the year with a cumulative output of 2.2 billion megawatt-hours (MWh). If the energy produced by Itaipu could be stored, since 1984, when it was commissioned, until today, this amount would be enough to supply electric energy for the entire Earth for 37 days.

No other power plant has produced as much. Among the top 12 power plant generators in the world, Itaipu is first on cumulative output. The ranking accounts also plants that were commissioned before the Brazilian-Paraguayan company.

One example is Grand Coulee Dam, in the United States, which started generating electricity on 1941. Its cumulative production has reached, on 2014, 1.2 billion MWh. Also on the list is Three Gorges Dam, in China, which has been operating since 2003 and has a cumulated output of 0.8 billion MWh.

Regarding cumulative production, Itaipu comes as undisputed leader. The second best is Guri Dam, in Venezuela, which started operations on 1978 and produced a total of 1.3 billion MWh. After the American Grand Coulee Dam (1.2 billion MWh), comes Russian power plant Sayano-Shushenskaya Dam, which has been producing since 1978 and has a cumulative output of 0.93 billion MWh.

In fifth place there is Churchill Falls, in Canada, commissioned in 1971 and which has produced 0.9 billion MWh so far. Tied in sixth position are Bratsk Power Station, from Russia, which produced, since 1967, 0.8 billion MWh, and China’s Three Gorges Dam.

Brazilian power plant Tucuruí is number seven. Since 1984, has produced 0.78 billion MWh. In eight place there is another Russian power plant, as well as in ninth. Number ten is Robert-Burassa, in Canada, which started producing energy in 1979 and has a cumulative output of 0.75 billion.

On 11th place, Krasnoyarsk, that produced 0.7 billion since 1971. The last one on the ranking is Tarbela, in Pakistan, commissioned in 1976 and with a total output of 0.41 billion.

 

 

Power Plant

Country

Year of Commissioning

Production / billion MWh

1

Itaipu Binational

Brazil-Paraguay

1984

2.2

2

Guri Dam

Venezuela

1978

1.3

3

Coulee Dam

USA

1941

1.2

4

Sayano-Shushenskaya Dam

Russia

1978

0.93

5

Churchill Falls

Canada

1971

0.9

6

Bratsk Power Station

Three Gorges Dam

Russia

China

1967

2006

0.8

7

Tucuruí Dam

Brazil

1984

0.78

8

Volzhskaya

Russia

1961

0.77

9

Ust-Ilimsk

Russia

1980

0.76

10

Robert-Burassa

Canada

1979

0.75

11

Krasnoyarsk

Russia

1971

0.7

12

Tarbela

Pakistan

1976

0.4

 

Strategic position

For both Brazil and Paraguay, Itaipu’s production is essential for energetic infrastructure and development. During the last decade, the power plant has produced an average of 92 million megawatt-hours (MWh), an amount much higher than what was specified in the Treaty that created the binational: 75 million MWh.

Cumulated output and market

With Itaipu cumulated production of 2.2 billion MWh, it would be possible to supply China, the world’s largest electricity consumer market, for five months and nine days; the United Stated, for six months and 12 days. The Brazilian market would be provided for four years, nine months and 16 days, while its partner on the enterprise, Paraguay, would be supplied for 181 years, three months and 18 days.

India would be serviced by two years, three months and 25 days. Canada would be attended by four years and six days. Australia, for nine years and two months and 20 days; France, for four years, six months and seven days; Germany, for three years, eight months and 22 days.

Portugal would be lighted for 43 years, nine months and eight days. Spain would have power for eight years, four months and ten days. The UK would be supplied for six years, three months and nine days. Japan, for two years, two months and 25 days.

For Latin America, the 2.223 billion mean energy to supply, for example, Argentina, for 17 years, six months and nine days. Venezuela would have energy for 21 years, four months and 22 days. Chile would be supplied for 32 years, ten months and 25 days.

Brazil

The city of São Paulo would be supplied for 75 years, four months and 26 days. Rio de Janeiro, for 121 years and one month. Curitiba would have power to meet its consumption for 459 years, 11 months and 17 days. Foz do Iguaçu, where the plant is located, would have electricity for 4 thousand, 227 years, 1 month and 21 days.

Milestones

In 2014, Itaipu celebrated two important milestones: the 40th anniversary of the entity’s establishment, on May 17, 1974, and 30 years of generation, on May 5, 1984. In fact, the plant began generating power nine years later the beginning of its construction.

 

Annual production

In the end of 2014, Itaipu reached the annual production of 87.8 million MWh. Taking into consideration the atypical of the year, the production is considered very good. In 2014, Brazil faced one of the worse water deficits in its history. In 2013, however, the situation was quite different. With a highly positive scenario of water and operational point of view, the plant generated 98,630,035 MWh, breaking his own world record of energy production, which occurred in 2012, with 98,287,128 megawatt-hours (MWh). The previous record was in 2008, when Itaipu generated 94,684,781 MWh.

Efficiency

Although it generated less in 2014 than in 2013, Itaipu reached in 2014 the best operating efficiency ratio of 30 years, with 99.3%. In practice, this means that the operation of the plant, which aims to maximize the use of water (available energy), meeting the demands of the Brazilian and Paraguayan electrical systems, had almost zero losses. That is, of the water that could be charged, almost nothing was poured out in 2014. All available charged water was used in the production of energy.